Best of Our Blog: A Cup of Joe and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

We’ve culled through the statistics and pulled together some of our most-read blog items since we launched. Below are two of the favorites.

A Cup of Joe — Stuff of Life or Poison?

In this country, we drink 400 million cups of coffee per day. We consume over 45% of the world’s coffee production. For the record, some of the Scandinavian countries consume three times more coffee per person.

Given all this coffee drinking, it’s no surprise that this is one of the most researched beverages on the planet. And yet there is almost universal confusion on the health consequences of coffee drinking.
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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Made Clear in 10 Paragraphs

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is an occupational medical diagnosis that often gives employers, patients, and sometimes even medical providers, undue levels of frustration. Like a lot of other things in medicine, reasonably simple concepts are hidden behind Latin words. You just need a basic understanding of how things are put together – in other words, anatomy.

Let’s start with the hands. The hands are absolute miracles of micro-engineering. They are capable of generating tremendous force, while being compact and delicate enough to pay a violin. They pull this off by putting the muscles that work the fingers in the forearm. These muscles are connected by cables, called tendons, to the fingers. Contract a muscle in the forearm, it pulls the cable (tendon) and moves the finger. I never fail to be impressed by the cleverness with which the human body is put together.

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